Sugar Labeling May Reduce Cancer Risk

Obesity rates are on the rise in the United States, with almost every 4 in 10 adults affected. This condition puts people at an increased risk for developing 13 different types of cancers, including breast, colon and rectum, endometrium, esophagus, kidney, and pancreas, among others. Added sugars are deemed to be one of the culprits of obesity. In an effort to address the obesity epidemic, the FDA mandated in 2016 the use of sugar labeling, such as sugar content, on packaged foods. In order to d...
Continue reading

Lenalidomide for High-Risk Smoldering Multiple Myeloma

​ In results soon to be presented at the American Society of Clinical Oncology Annual Meeting (ASCO), the E3A06 phase 3 clinical trial has found that single-agent lenalidomide (Revlimid®, Celgene) improves progression-free survival in patients with asymptomatic high-risk smoldering multiple myeloma (SMM). Smoldering multiple myeloma is a pre-cancerous, asymptomatic clonal plasma cell disorder with a high chance of progressing to multiple myeloma. Treatment for this condition has typically been l...
Continue reading

How Soon After Quitting Smoking Does Bladder Cancer Risk Decrease?

One of the biggest risk factors for bladder cancer is smoking. Evidence has shown that former smokers have a reduced risk of bladder cancer compared with current smokers, but how long does it take after quitting for that risk to decrease, and how much does the risk decrease compared with that of never-smokers? According to a new study analyzing bladder cancer risk in postmenopausal women, former smokers' bladder cancer risk decreases by 25% within the first 10 years after quitting and continues ...
Continue reading

Nutrition Supplements: Do They Do More Harm Than Good?

According to a new study, nutrition supplements may not be as beneficial as nutrients derived from food for reducing all-cause mortality. In fact, certain supplements taken in excess may actually promote some cancers. "As potential benefits and harms of supplement use continue to be studied, some studies have found associations between excess nutrient intake and adverse outcomes, including increased risk of certain cancers," remarked Fang Fang Zhang, MD, PhD, Associate Professor at the Friedman ...
Continue reading

Education, Socioeconomic Status, and Race Affect Cancer Prevention Behaviors

Even though overall cancer death rates have dropped in the United States, a recent review of the prevalence of lifestyle cancer risk factors revealed that there are huge socioeconomic and racial disparities in major risk factors that, if eliminated, could further accelerate the drop in cancer deaths. Several modifiable lifestyle factors, such as tobacco smoking, excess body weight, high alcohol intake, poor diet, lack of physical activity, ultraviolet radiation exposure, and lack of cancer scree...
Continue reading

© Copyright 2019 i3 Health. All rights reserved.