Fiber and Whole Grains Reduce Cancer, Cardiovascular Risks

​ Dietary fiber and whole grains are commonly thought to be good for our health. But do they truly have an impact on the risk of noncommunicable diseases, including cancer, heart disease, and other conditions? According to a new study published in The Lancet , the answer to that question is yes. "Previous reviews and meta-analyses have usually examined a single indicator of carbohydrate quality and a limited number of diseases, so it has not been possible to establish which foods to recommend fo...
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US Cancer Deaths Have Dropped 27% Over 25 Years

Although cancer is still the second leading cause of death after heart disease for both men and women, its overall lethality has nonetheless diminished steadily and significantly thanks to the progress of research. In its newly released annual report on cancer statistics, the American Cancer Society found that cancer death rates in the United States dropped continuously from 1991 to 2016 by a total of 27%. The authors of the report, published in CA: A Cancer Journal for Clinicians , note that th...
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Enzyme Identified as Contributor to Cancer Growth

A stem cell enzyme, adenosine deaminase associated with RNA1 (ADAR1), has been identified as an active component of over 20 types of cancer, including liver, breast, and leukemia. A new test to detect ADAR1 could have the capability of being a potential way to screen for cancer. Adenosine deaminase associated with RNA1 is one of three enzymes encoded by the ADAR genes. Because they modify nucleotides within double-stranded RNA molecules, in turn regulating gene expression, these enzymes are esse...
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Genetic Factor Found in Esophageal Cancer’s Racial Disparity

Why is esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC) significantly more common among European Americans than among African Americans, even though both groups experience similar rates of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), a relative risk factor for this condition? Researchers have found the reason, along with a potential means to end this disparity. "We've known for a long time that esophageal adenocarcinoma primarily affects Caucasians and very rarely affects African Americans," stated David G. Beer, PhD...
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Cancer Screening—Suitable Time for Lifestyle Feedback?

Lifestyle factors can contribute to either causing or preventing cancer. It is important to provide education for patients on how to reduce their risks. According to a recent study, cancer screenings provide an opportune time to instruct patients on healthy habits. In this study, published in Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention, 1,054 patients received education on lifestyle factors to prevent colon cancer after undergoing a colorectal cancer screening. All patients filled out a lif...
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