Education, Socioeconomic Status, and Race Affect Cancer Prevention Behaviors

Even though overall cancer death rates have dropped in the United States, a recent review of the prevalence of lifestyle cancer risk factors revealed that there are huge socioeconomic and racial disparities in major risk factors that, if eliminated, could further accelerate the drop in cancer deaths. Several modifiable lifestyle factors, such as tobacco smoking, excess body weight, high alcohol intake, poor diet, lack of physical activity, ultraviolet radiation exposure, and lack of cancer scree...
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Number of Mitochondria Linked to Cancer Treatment Response

Treating cancer is a difficult process because it is challenging to predict the cancer's response to therapy; often, cancer cells with matching genetic makeup will respond differently to the same treatment. Developing effective first-line treatments is therefore a priority. Researchers at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai and the IBM Thomas J. Watson Research Center have now discovered that the number of mitochondria present in cancer cells reveals how the cancer will respond to treatm...
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Potential Drug Target for p53 Discovered

The p53 tumor suppressor protein is a crucial component to hindering cancerous growth; however, when this protein is mutated, cancer frequently occurs. Researchers at the University of Wisconsin-Madison reported that a regulator of the protein, known as the enzyme PIPK1-alpha, could be a potential therapeutic target. The researchers of the study, published in Nature Cell Biology, described the typical behavior of the p53 protein as being the "guardian of the genome" by activating the repair of D...
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Infertility Associated With a Higher Risk of Cancer

Researchers discovered that women who are infertile have a higher risk of developing cancer compared with women who are fertile. "We do not know the causes of the increase in cancer that we found in this study, whether it might be the infertility itself, the causes of the infertility, or the infertility treatment. We can only show there is an association between them. In the future, we hope that we will be able to understand why infertile women are at higher risk of cancer; for example, by ident...
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Nurses’ Handling of Hazardous Drugs: An Interview With Christopher Friese, PhD, RN, AOCN®, FAAN

When nurses do not wear appropriate personal protective equipment while administering chemotherapy drugs, they risk exposure, which increases their chances of developing leukemia and other cancers, adverse reproductive outcomes, and chromosomal damage. In this interview with i3 Health, Dr. Friese provides insight regarding his study of an intervention to improve nurses' handling of hazardous drugs, the implications of unsafe handling, and potential solutions to improve the safety of nurses who a...
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