Cancer Screening—Suitable Time for Lifestyle Feedback?

Lifestyle factors can contribute to either causing or preventing cancer. It is important to provide education for patients on how to reduce their risks. According to a recent study, cancer screenings provide an opportune time to instruct patients on healthy habits. In this study, published in Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention, 1,054 patients received education on lifestyle factors to prevent colon cancer after undergoing a colorectal cancer screening. All patients filled out a lif...
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Too Few Utilize Post-Adenoma Surveillance Colonoscopy

Although most colon polyps are benign, one type—adenomas—can become cancerous. Advanced adenomas carry a particularly increased risk, so experts recommend a follow-up colonoscopy three years after patients have had them removed. A new study has found that many people who are diagnosed with advanced adenomas do not undergo a subsequent colonoscopy within the recommended time frame. "This is called surveillance colonoscopy, and it improves our chances of preventing colorectal cancer or detecting i...
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Childhood IBD Linked to Cancer Deaths and Overall Mortality

Researchers have found that childhood inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) puts individuals at increased risk of early death in both childhood and adulthood, with cancer playing a predominant role. For the study, published online in Gastroenterology , researchers from the Karolinska Institutet used data from the Swedish nationwide health registers to identify 9,442 children under the age of 18 diagnosed with IBD between 1964 and 2014. These were compared to 93,180 controls from the general populatio...
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Colon Cancer-Inducing Inflammation Accompanies Obesity

Researchers have found that levels of two inflammation-inducing proteins in the colon rise incrementally with weight, increasing an individual's risk of colon cancer. The third most common cancer in the United States, colon cancer is the second most frequent cause of death of the cancers that impact both men and women. Obesity contributes to colon cancer risk by raising systemic levels of substances that cause inflammation, a complex biological response that can promote a variety of cancers and ...
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Stomach Bacteria Linked to Colorectal Cancer

The bacteria H. pylori , which has previously been associated with stomach cancer, has now been linked to the increased likelihood of certain colorectal cancers. Researchers at Duke University Medical Center who evaluated the bacteria also found that its presence was particularly harmful in African Americans when compared with other populations. The researchers analyzed blood samples from 10 large regional studies. Among the 8,400 ethnically diverse participants, half had later developed colon c...
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