In Vitro Fertilization Linked to Childhood Cancers? An Interview With Logan Spector, PhD

In vitro fertilization (IVF) has been thought to potentially cause an increased risk of cancer in children, especially because IVF is linked to childhood cancer risk factors such as imprinting disorders and birth defects. Logan Spector, PhD, Professor at University of Minnesota, and colleagues found a small correlation between IVF and childhood cancer; however, the increased rate of embryonal cancers, specifically hepatic tumors, could not be attributed to IVF per se rather than to underlying in...
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Does In Vitro Fertilization Increase a Child’s Risk of Cancer?

In vitro fertilization (IVF) is a popular method used to conceive children. However, it can increase chances of birth defects and imprinting disorders, both of which are associated with a higher risk of childhood cancer. Researchers at the University of Minnesota conducted a cohort study in order to investigate whether there is an increased occurrence of cancer among children conceived via IVF compared with children conceived naturally. For the study, published in JAMA Pediatrics, the researcher...
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Antibody-Drug Conjugate Is Powerful Against Neuroblastoma

Researchers at the Cancer Center of Children's Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP) have developed an antibody-drug conjugate (ADC) that is powerfully effective against mouse models of neuroblastoma expressing wild-type and mutant anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK). Neuroblastoma, a cancer of the peripheral nervous system typically found in children younger than 5, is the third most common pediatric cancer and the most common cancer in infants. It accounts for over 10% of all childhood cancer-related d...
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In Ependymoma, Post-Surgery Radiation Increases Survival

​ A phase 2 clinical trial reports that for children with ependymoma, the third most common pediatric brain tumor, radiation immediately following surgical resection substantially increases survival, even improving outcomes for children under the age of three. "Historically, children under the age of three with ependymoma have a worse prognosis than older children," said Thomas E. Merchant, DO, PhD, Chair of the Department of Radiation Oncology at St. Jude Children's Research Hospital and first ...
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New Technology Characterizes Rare Pediatric Cancer

In a new study conducted by researchers at Princeton University in collaboration with Michigan State University and the University of Oslo, a unified computational framework called Unveiling RNA Sample Annotation for Human Diseases (URSA HD ) analyzed hundreds of molecular patterns of various diseases instantaneously, detecting genes behind a wide variety of diseases. Four of the genes that the researchers identified were linked to neuroblastoma, a rare form of cancer that predominantly affects ...
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